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Critical reception was at first lukewarm but became more favorable after the first season, when the series began to explore its mythology, including parallel universes and [[wikipedia:Alternate history|alternate timelines]]. The show, along with cast and crew, were nominated for many major awards. Despite its move to the "[[wikipedia:Friday night death slot|Friday night death slot]]" and low [[wikipedia:Nielsen ratings|ratings]], the series developed a [[wikipedia:cult following|cult following]]. It also spawned two six-part [[wikipedia:comic book|comic book]] series, an [[wikipedia:alternate reality game|alternate reality game]], and three novels.
Critical reception was at first lukewarm but became more favorable after the first season, when the series began to explore its mythology, including parallel universes and [[wikipedia:Alternate history|alternate timelines]]. The show, along with cast and crew, were nominated for many major awards. Despite its move to the "[[wikipedia:Friday night death slot|Friday night death slot]]" and low [[wikipedia:Nielsen ratings|ratings]], the series developed a [[wikipedia:cult following|cult following]]. It also spawned two six-part [[wikipedia:comic book|comic book]] series, an [[wikipedia:alternate reality game|alternate reality game]], and three novels.
== The protagonist and his relationship with God ==
'''Walter Bishop''' was an eccentric researcher specializing in [[fringe:fringe science|fringe science]].
He was one of the most brilliant scientific minds of his generation with an above average [[w:Intelligence_quotient|I.Q.]] of 196. From the 1970s until around 1991, Walter, an endowed chair of Biochemistry at Harvard, conducted experiments in the [[fringe:Harvard Laboratory|basement]] of the college's Kresge building, along with his lab partner [[fringe:William Bell|William Bell]] and their assistants. The field of the duo's experiments ranged from quantum physics to genetic engineering, propelling Walter into an unknown relationship with the U.S. government to advance its most scientifically innovative -- and ethically questionable -- research projects under the heading of fringe science.
At one point [[fringe:Timeline#1980s|in the early 1980s]], Walter assisted [[fringe:William Bell|William Bell]]'s experiments on children using the drug "[[fringe:Cortexiphan|Cortexiphan]]". The test subjects included both [[fringe:Olivia Dunham|Olivia Dunham]] and [[fringe:Nick Lane|Nick Lane]]. ("[[fringe:Bad Dreams|Bad Dreams]]")
An accident in 1991 resulted in the death of at least one of his assistants, [[fringe:Carla Warren|Carla Warren]] ("[[fringe:The No-Brainer|The No-Brainer]]"), beginning many accusations of Walter using humans as guinea pigs for his experiments.
Charged with manslaughter, Walter was instead deemed mentally unstable and admitted to St. Claire's Psychiatric Institution. Only Walter's immediate family were able to visit him in the institution, though it took seventeen years before his son, [[fringe:Peter Bishop|Peter Bishop]], would even speak to him.
After seventeen years of being locked up in a mental institution, which had many negative effects on his personality, Walter was eventually recruited by the FBI to work in their [[fringe:Fringe Division|Fringe Division]] alongside [[fringe:Olivia Dunham|Olivia Dunham]] and his son, [[fringe:Peter Bishop|Peter Bishop]].
When Walter has an MRI of his brain, his charts show that he has been through a procedure on his brain. A review of Walter's test results showed that has had three incisions on the left temporal lobe. Walter had tissue removed from his hippocampus, which stores memory and contributes to spatial awareness. This was done by his friend William Bell to remove the memory of how Walter opened the doorway to the dimension. When his brain pieces were reconnected by [[fringe:Thomas Jerome Newton|Thomas Jerome Newton]] he seemed more normal than ever. ("[[fringe:Grey Matters|Grey Matters]]")
'''Walter says that he had been an atheist until he stole Peter from the other side. The night after the crime Walter instinctually realized that he had violated God's trust and domain and believes the series of misfortunes that have taken place since have been God punishing him. Walter asks God for proof of his forgiveness in the form of a white tulip. When another scientist points out that tulips don't bloom at this time of year, Walter responds "But he's ''God''". He further explains that "If God can forgive me maybe it's in the realm of possibilities that my son can forgive me too"''' ("[[fringe:The Man from the Other Side|The Man from the Other Side]]")


== Creation, life and death ==
== Creation, life and death ==