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Difference between revisions of "Fringe (TV series)"

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'''''Fringe''''' is<!--"is" is correct, the show suddenly hasn't started to cease existing after its last episode--> an American [[wikipedia:science fiction on television|science fiction television]] series created by [[wikipedia:J. J. Abrams|J. J. Abrams]], [[wikipedia:Alex Kurtzman|Alex Kurtzman]], and [[wikipedia:Roberto Orci|Roberto Orci]]. It premiered on the [[wikipedia:Fox Broadcasting Company|Fox]] network on September 9, 2008, and concluded on January 18, 2013, after [[wikipedia:List of Fringe episodes|five seasons and 100 episodes]]. The series follows [[wikipedia:Olivia Dunham|Olivia Dunham]] ([[wikipedia:Anna Torv|Anna Torv]]), [[wikipedia:Peter Bishop|Peter Bishop]] ([[wikipedia:Joshua Jackson|Joshua Jackson]]), and [[wikipedia:Walter Bishop (Fringe)|Walter Bishop]] ([[wikipedia:John Noble|John Noble]]), all members of the fictional Fringe Division of the [[wikipedia:Federal Bureau of Investigation|Federal Bureau of Investigation]], based in [[wikipedia:Boston|Boston]], [[wikipedia:Massachusetts|Massachusetts]], under the supervision of [[wikipedia:United States Department of Homeland Security|Homeland Security]]. The team uses [[wikipedia:fringe science|fringe science]] and FBI investigative techniques to investigate a series of unexplained, often ghastly occurrences, which are related to mysteries surrounding a [[wikipedia:parallel universe (fiction)|parallel universe]].
'''''Fringe''''' is<!--"is" is correct, the show suddenly hasn't started to cease existing after its last episode--> an American [[wikipedia:science fiction on television|science fiction television]] series created by [[wikipedia:J. J. Abrams|J. J. Abrams]], [[wikipedia:Alex Kurtzman|Alex Kurtzman]], and [[wikipedia:Roberto Orci|Roberto Orci]]. It premiered on the [[wikipedia:Fox Broadcasting Company|Fox]] network on September 9, 2008, and concluded on January 18, 2013, after [[wikipedia:List of Fringe episodes|five seasons and 100 episodes]]. The series follows [[wikipedia:Olivia Dunham|Olivia Dunham]] ([[wikipedia:Anna Torv|Anna Torv]]), [[wikipedia:Peter Bishop|Peter Bishop]] ([[wikipedia:Joshua Jackson|Joshua Jackson]]), and [[wikipedia:Walter Bishop (Fringe)|Walter Bishop]] ([[wikipedia:John Noble|John Noble]]), all members of the fictional Fringe Division of the [[wikipedia:Federal Bureau of Investigation|Federal Bureau of Investigation]], based in [[wikipedia:Boston|Boston]], [[wikipedia:Massachusetts|Massachusetts]], under the supervision of [[wikipedia:United States Department of Homeland Security|Homeland Security]]. The team uses [[wikipedia:fringe science|fringe science]] and FBI investigative techniques to investigate a series of unexplained, often ghastly occurrences, which are related to mysteries surrounding a [[wikipedia:parallel universe (fiction)|parallel universe]].


The series has been described as a hybrid of fantasy, [[wikipedia:procedural drama|procedural drama]]s and [[wikipedia:Serial (radio and television)|serials]], influenced by films like ''[[wikipedia:Altered States|Altered States]]'' and television shows such as ''[[wikipedia:Lost (TV series)|Lost]]'', ''[[wikipedia:The X-Files|The X-Files]]'' and ''[[wikipedia:The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)|The Twilight Zone]]''. The series began as a traditional [[wikipedia:Villain of the week|mystery-of-the-week]] series and became more serialized in later seasons. Most episodes contain a standalone plot, with several others also exploring the series' overarching [[wikipedia:Mythology of Fringe|mythology]].
The series has been described as a hybrid of fantasy, [[wikipedia:procedural drama|procedural dramas]] and [[wikipedia:Serial (radio and television)|serials]], influenced by films like ''[[wikipedia:Altered States|Altered States]]'' and television shows such as ''[[wikipedia:Lost (TV series)|Lost]]'', ''[[wikipedia:The X-Files|The X-Files]]'' and ''[[wikipedia:The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)|The Twilight Zone]]''. The series began as a traditional [[wikipedia:Villain of the week|mystery-of-the-week]] series and became more serialized in later seasons. Most episodes contain a standalone plot, with several others also exploring the series' overarching [[wikipedia:Mythology of Fringe|mythology]].


Critical reception was at first lukewarm but became more favorable after the first season, when the series began to explore its mythology, including parallel universes and [[wikipedia:Alternate history|alternate timelines]]. The show, along with cast and crew, were nominated for many major awards. Despite its move to the "[[wikipedia:Friday night death slot|Friday night death slot]]" and low [[wikipedia:Nielsen ratings|ratings]], the series developed a [[wikipedia:cult following|cult following]]. It also spawned two six-part [[wikipedia:comic book|comic book]] series, an [[wikipedia:alternate reality game|alternate reality game]], and three novels.
Critical reception was at first lukewarm but became more favorable after the first season, when the series began to explore its mythology, including parallel universes and [[wikipedia:Alternate history|alternate timelines]]. The show, along with cast and crew, were nominated for many major awards. Despite its move to the "[[wikipedia:Friday night death slot|Friday night death slot]]" and low [[wikipedia:Nielsen ratings|ratings]], the series developed a [[wikipedia:cult following|cult following]]. It also spawned two six-part [[wikipedia:comic book|comic book]] series, an [[wikipedia:alternate reality game|alternate reality game]], and three novels.